Gillmore Centre for Financial Technology

The primary mission of the Gillmore Centre for Financial Technology is to conduct world-class, cutting-edge research at the intersection of finance and technology. The Centre engages in research exploring the transformative impact of emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, mobile payments, cryptocurrencies and crowdfunding platforms on financial activities.  

This is a multi-disciplinary endeavour necessitating expertise in diverse domains such as information systems, data science, finance, artificial intelligence, behavioural science, and engineering. Consequently, the Centre engages with members from different groups within WBS, and across the University of Warwick and other HE institutions, both in UK and globally. Research that leads to high quality journal publications and has the potential to generate funding from granting agencies is encouraged and supported. 

The Centre seeks to drive three key pillars of research, focused on: 

  • The consumer – to explore innovative products and services to empower consumers and enable financial literacy 

  • The firm  - to explore the use of, and financial investment in, AI/ML technologies to drive processes and structures. Explore how digital strategies shape the future and emergent industry structures 

  • Wider society – to explore the influence and impact of financial technologies on wider society and behaviours. This includes cryptocurrencies and financial regulations, cyber security and public trust in new financial technologies and associated services. 

Head of Centre: Professor Ram Gopal.

Latest research news

Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship
How can digital platforms beat their rivals?

Kalina Staykova and her colleagues used their studies of MobilePay to create a competition grid advising firms how to defeat multiple rivals online.

Finance and Markets
AI set to revolutionise financial investment

Traditional financial and investment management research and work-flows will be heavily disrupted by AI over the next 10 years, a symposium of leading researchers heard.