Strategy and Organisational Change

Strategy and Organisational Change

Building a strategic advantage is central to any organisation’s future, but with the fourth industrial revolution set to unleash technologies that could side-swipe any industry, create new ones and deconstruct the very notion of an ‘industry,’ strategists need new tools. 

From open strategy and behavioural strategy to strategy process and practice, how organisations decipher what they need to do today will help them shape the future to their advantage. 

With our research in top journals like Academy of Management Review and Organization Science, WBS is helping companies large and small to build the guiding principles they need to succeed, and our students benefit on highly-ranked courses like the MSc Marketing & Strategy. 

Latest Strategy and Organisational Change Research

Strategy and Organisational Change
How does a firm keep its strategy on track?

Once a company designs its strategy to achieve its mission how does it make sure it is on course and actually implementing the strategy? Loizos Heracelous, Professor of Strategy, explains.

Strategy and Organisational Change
Will Unilever CEO Alan Jope be forced out?

Unilever are under attack from activist investors as their returns continue to disappoint and their share price slides. John Colley analyses what is going on at the British multinational.

Strategy and Organisational Change
Do scandals really affect a company's reputation?

High-profile companies are often caught up in scandals and spend huge amounts of money on PR to protect their reputation. Irina Surdu's research looks at how badly a reputation is damaged by negative headlines.

Strategy and Organisational Change
How to devise the next management craze

Management fads and concepts come and go, but why do some gain more traction than others. Jeker Denrell, Professor of Behavioural, unearths some important lessons.

Strategy and Organisational Change
Why it can pay to invest in underdogs

Jerker Denrell explores the impact of luck and overemphasis on previous success in this article, originally published in Harvard Business Review.